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Synthos Technologies Begins Private Beta Test Period

Reston, VA – Synthos Technologies, a division of Qbase, LLC, today announced that it has begun a private beta test of its latest technology: an enterprise application built on top of the company’s own in-memory computing platform with embedded, on-the-fly analytics.

Diverse Group of Companies Using Innovative, New Technology 

Reston, VA – Synthos Technologies, a division of Qbase, LLC, today announced that it has begun a private beta test of its latest technology: an enterprise application built on top of the company’s own in-memory computing platform with embedded, on-the-fly analytics.

The Synthos Application puts intuitive, powerful, real-time analytic capabilities into the hands of more business professionals than ever before.  It allows users to examine enormous amounts of constantly streaming data to find trends, make comparisons, aggregate information, identify critical content, assess the content and draw conclusions.

“We fundamentally believe that the way people interact with information – whether it’s on the web, with real-time content sources, or within their own organizations – is due for a dramatic shift,” Synthos Technologies CEO Erin-Michael Gill said. “As companies amass more and more information, and as the big data world gets bigger and more complex, organizations are increasingly going to demand technologies that allow them to put their hands on critical, accurate, real-time information. And to easily make sense of it like never before.

“That means creating tools that empower any professional –regardless of their function – to ask new types of questions of their data, to explore connections that were never before apparent, to change the entire lens through which they view the information they have, alongside information they never even knew they needed, and to see that body of information updated as new information is created in real-time.”

The Synthos Application ingests real-time news from more than 15,000 English-language sources worldwide. It reads every article as a human would and extracts the people, places and organizations mentioned in the text. It then uses complex algorithms to correctly distinguish between — or disambiguate — same-named or similarly-named entities. The solution provides users with counts of the entities and their relationships to other entities, uncovering new insights from the data. The app also allows a person to prune the results in ways that are most useful to them, before exporting reports to others.

“This first version of the application demonstrates the power of our underlying computing platform,” Synthos Technologies Chief Technology Officer Scott Lightner said. “When we built that platform, we started with the premise that modern database technology was failing enterprises in two important ways. First, it wasn’t allowing companies to fully leverage all of their data assets to gain meaningful insights. Companies had to stockpile predetermined answers to a set of predetermined questions and to ask people – primarily in IT – to query the database. We now have the ability to derive the best answer to a question in real-time, and to empower people to ask entirely new types of questions. The second way these technologies were failing is that they were simply not equipped to handle noisy and imprecise data from disparate data sources. Getting meaningful, accurate insight from the data – especially if it were unstructured – continues to be a challenge. And it’s one we are uniquely situated to address.”

During its private beta test period, Synthos Technologies will be working with roughly a dozen companies – from multibillion-dollar conglomerates to known consumer products brands – to further refine its solution. Individuals participating as testers within these organizations include those in the business strategy, reputation research, communications and advocacy divisions. Envisioned use cases include due diligence support, relationship exploration, competitive intelligence and media monitoring and analysis.

“We’re excited about what’s ahead and look forward to the input – and resulting development planning – coming out of this test period,” Gill concluded. “We’re fortunate to have the participation of so many diverse organizations and to be able to build from our existing GIS and data cleansing tools to develop something that is both powerful and meaningful.”